Ball State Graduate School Blog

Where will graduate school take you?


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A Day in the Life of Jes Wade, a public administration graduate student

Howdy, howdy, howdy! My name is Jes Wade, and I am a full-time graduate student in public administration, full-time AmeriCorps VISTA and a part-time graduate assistant. I’m going to take you on a journey through my typical week: responsibilities, classes, and all the other random things I do throughout a given week. Before I start here’s a condensed list of what I do in a week: gym, food, work, class, homework, work.

Sunday:

I wake up around the same time each day, between 7:45 and 8 a.m. to make it to the gym or go for a run by 8:15 a.m. I’ve raced one full and three half marathons since July. I like to make fitness a priority. I generally spend 1-2 hours of my day here.

Sundays are my way to recover from all the craziness throughout the week and to prep for the craziness I’m about to endure. I start my day at the gym, find my way to the supermarket to buy groceries, then meal prep for the week. When I have time I start my readings for the week and finish up any last minute homework if I have any.

Monday:

I start my day at the gym, and after working out I hurry home and get ready for the day. Since I’ve already meal prepped for the week, I scoop up my belongings, and I’m on my way to the Boys & Girls Club between 10-11 a.m. where I work as an AmeriCorps VISTA (project coordinator). I typically spend 6-8 hours a day here to get my full-time hours. In this position I am responsible for nearly all aspects of our external communication ranging from weekly emails to donors, social media, weekly newsletters and more.

I’m typically leaving the Club anywhere between 5:30-7 p.m. depending on when I arrived. Throughout the week, I’m also assigned work for two professors in the Political Science Department, for my part-time graduate assistantship. I find time between all my activities to complete that work, as it’s typically work I can complete from home.

On Mondays I leave at 6 p.m. to make it to my Policy Analysis class at 6:30 p.m. In this Immersive Learning class we are attempting to tackle the issue of blight in the Muncie community. So far it’s been extremely interesting. My group is covering the awareness aspect of it.

By the time I get home (usually around 9 or 9:30 p.m.) I’m pretty pooped from the long day. My boyfriend, and I will generally pick out a movie and fall asleep on the couch by 11 p.m.

Tuesday:

Same start time for my day. I try and donate plasma at BioLife on Tuesdays and Thursdays for extra saving money. During this time I do weekly readings for my two classes. This generally takes about an hour, and afterword I’m on my way to work. On Tuesdays at the Club I work on our Club Connection, a newsletter for donors, parents and generally anyone interested in the Club.

After work I head straight to the Cardinal Kitchen food pantry where I am the unit director in charge of up keeping inventory and donations. This was an initiative I started through Student Government Association my senior year as an undergrad here at Ball State in 2014.

By 8 p.m. I am home and eating. By 9-9:30 p.m., I am heading to Trivia at the Chug, a bar not far from campus. Win or lose I’m usually snug in my bed by 11:30 p.m.

Wednesday:

Still waking up at the same time and hitting the gym. Still going to work at the Club. Still working on homework and readings. Wednesdays I have an online lecture class from 8-10 p.m. And you guessed it! I’m in bed around 11 p.m.

Thursday:

Still waking up and starting my day at the gym. Still going to work. About once or twice a month I have a Graduate School Ambassador meeting. On Thursdays I post our Club Connection to our website and prep our email that goes out to 5,000+ contacts for Friday morning. After work I have a standing group meeting. If we’ve decided we need to meet I attend the meeting, if not I head straight to BioLife. After that I have free time, by this point in the week I usually have little homework and readings to do. So I have smooth sailings until the weekend. Am I in bed around 11 p.m.? You betcha!

Friday:

Fridays are the same as Thursdays minus the BioLife donation and standing meeting. Fridays are nice because I finally get to relax.

Saturday:

Saturday is a rugby day (when rugby is in season). That’s generally the end of August to the beginning of November and mid-March to the end of April. If I don’t have a game I might be helping the Graduate School and the Political Science Department with an info session, or going to a different kind of competition—most recently I went to the NASPAA Food Insecurity Simulation in Indianapolis.

And that is my typical week, I tried to include most of what I do, but obviously I couldn’t type it all out. Here are a few cool things I’ve done or will do as a grad student.

In the upcoming weeks I’m going to:

  • A career advising appointment to look over my resume before I start applying to jobs like crazy
  • Travel to Nashville, Tenn., for a rugby tournament called NashBash
  • Purchase my graduate gown
  • Turn 24 next month!

In the past few weeks I have:

  • Enjoyed my first cruise. I went to Progreso and Cozumel, Mexico
  • Saw “Get Out” opening weekend
  • Done a lot of shopping at Kohl’s

So I hope you have enjoyed this slight look into my life. There’s no such thing as a “typical” grad student, and no set path you have to take.


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A Day in the Life of Hilary Janysek, a graduate student in flute performance

Hi! I am Hilary Janysek, and I am a graduate student in flute performance. I am in my second year of study in the Doctor of Arts Degree, and it is my fourth year at Ball State (I also did my master’s degree here.) Coming to Ball State for graduate studies in music was a HUGE decision for me, as I moved far away from my friends and family, and left a well-paying job as a public-school teacher in Texas. However, as you will see in this snapshot of my life, grad school challenges me to think in new ways and inspires me to go after my dream of becoming a professional performer and university professor.

7:40 – 9:15 AM: This week was only the second week of the semester, so my schedule is still getting settled. I decided to take some down time last night instead of working on some assignments, which is why I woke up so early this morning. My day began by arriving at school at 7:40 a.m. to get to the library and prepare for my 9:30 a.m. class. The class is MUST 722: Seminar in the Principles of Music Theory, or more commonly referred to as Theory Pedagogy. In this course, we learn how to teach music theory to undergraduate students, which is part of the core music curriculum. Music Theory is usually taught by specialists, but many beginning university teachers are assigned to teach this course. Our assignment was to plan a 15-minute lesson on a topic of fundamentals. It had been a while since I had learned or taught the topic I was assigned, but once I started reviewing the text, I became very excited about teaching it. I typed out a lesson plan and printed it just in time to head to class.

On the way out of the library, I stopped by the main desk to pick up a bundle of books that came in through interlibrary loan (a FANTASTIC resource to use). I am starting a research project for my lecture recital, and I ordered many pieces I had never heard of before. Getting new music is like Christmas morning for me, so I was so excited to pick them up and am looking forward to trying them out later!

Interlibrary loan materials

Interlibrary loan materials

9:30-10:45: Theory Pedagogy class. We ran out of time for my teaching assignment, unfortunately. But, I had a blast acting like a student and trying to come up with questions undergraduates might ask. This energized my enthusiasm for teaching even more and got me fired up to teach my lesson next week!

10:50-11:50: Right after class, I had to run downstairs for a meeting with the graduate coordinator of the School of Music, Dr. Linda Pohly, and the director of graduate recruiting and enrollment, Stephanie Wilson. This was another inspiring moment in my day as I got to learn more about what happens “behind the scenes” in terms of recruiting management. We looked at enrollment numbers from previous years and discussed some ways that we can improve recruiting strategies for the future. This meeting and other activities I have participated in as a Graduate Recruiting Ambassador are so important to my career as a university professor, and I am so blessed to take part in them.

11:50-12:15: My “lunch” time. I had a few minutes to eat a power bar and answer emails before my next task. Don’t worry, I’ve been snacking all morning and will continue to snack in the afternoon when I can!

12:30-1:30: I teach a private flute lesson. While in grad school full-time, holding a graduate assistantship in Music History and participating in the Graduate Recruiting Ambassador Program, I also have a very small studio of private flute students to bring in a little extra income. My student today is also a private teacher in the area who wants to improve her playing and eventually audition for graduate programs. We enjoy high-level and pedagogical discussions throughout each lesson, which I LOVE!

1:30-2:30: After the lesson, I head back to the sanctuary of my office, where I spend some time answering emails, organizing some school work and preparing for another class I will be attending tonight.

2:30-4:45: These couple of hours are devoted to accomplishing work for my assistantship. As a GA, I am assigned to 20 hours of work per week. Usually, I teach an undergraduate course, MUHI 100, but this semester is devoted to more administrative tasks for faculty members—organizing and uploading Blackboard content, grading (oh, so much grading!) and working on data files that will lead to a professor’s publication.

5:00-7:40 PM: This is my final class of the day, MUSE 743: Seminar: The Role of Music in Higher Education. I have been looking forward to this class because of what I have heard from other students who have taken it. I knew the rumors would be true when the professor began the class with a statement about how his job in this class was to make sure we all got jobs. Great! That is what I need! Throughout the semester, we will discuss resumes, curriculum vitas, cover letters, the tenure process and how to make a good impression. In the first class, we all had to describe what job we wanted to apply for and why we were qualified in two minutes. It was a great exercise to prepare us to speak eloquently in an interview process. I left the class again feeling inspired and uplifted.

Dinner at Ruby Tuesday

Dinner at Ruby Tuesday

8:00-10:00 PM: Dinner! I had a pretty action-packed day today, so it was nice to meet up with one of my best friends and fellow grad student for dinner at Ruby Tuesday where we enjoyed good food, laughter and great discussion.

10:00-11:30 PM: Since I didn’t get much practice time in today, I had to end the day with a bit of practice. With such a hectic schedule, I really do love practicing. I can really feel progress happening and don’t have to worry about other work-oriented tasks.

Midnight: I finally get home and crash into my bed! I must get some good rest so I can do it all again tomorrow!

I’m not going to lie, life as a grad student for me is EXHAUSTING! But it is the kind of exhausting that makes you excited to get to work, learn and impact others. I would not be who I am today if I didn’t take a leap and go to grad school four years ago. I am excited for what the future holds after achieving my graduate degree, and I will always be thankful to Ball State for providing me with meaningful and applicable experiences, as well as the opportunity to collaborate with talented colleagues.