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2018 Winner of the GEMMY award

 

Dr. Linda Martin

Each year, the graduate school recognizes the important work faculty members do in recruiting talented graduate students. Nominees for the Excellence in Graduate Recruiting Award must be enrolled in the Graduate Enrollment Management Plan. This award (otherwise known as the  GEMMY award), is dedicated to recognizing the outstanding work of faculty members who are using innovative strategies in recruiting students.

The finalists included: Dr. Ruby Cain from the Department of Educational Studies, Dr. Ashley Donnelly from the Department of Telecommunications, Dr. Larry Judge from School of Kinesiology, Dr. Linda Martin from the Department of Elementary Education, Dr. Megumi Hamada from the Department of English, Dr. Jennifer Palilonis from the Department of Journalism, Dr. Chip Taylor from the Department of Political Science.

At Ball State University’s annual Graduate School Recognition Ceremony, the Graduate School honored Dr. Linda Martin from the Department of Elementary Education for her success in graduate recruiting and her commitment to graduate education and helping graduate students.

Dr. Linda Martin was extremely successful in recruiting graduate students. During her time as Director of Graduate Programs starting in 2014, graduate enrollment increased each year. From fall 2016 to fall 2017, graduate applications increased from 109 to 225. During the same period, enrollment grew from 117 to 172, an over 30% increase in just one year.

The personal contact with prospective students is vital to successful recruiting. “Dr. Martin’s success in graduate enrollment is due in large part to her dedication to responding quickly to student inquiries,” said Dr. Patricia Clark, professor and chair of the Department of Elementary Education. “From initial questions about our graduate programs, to course planning, to issues that arise as students progress through the program, Dr. Martin responds quickly, thoroughly, and with a genuine concern for the students.”

Congratulations to Dr. Linda Martin for winning the 2017-2018 Excellence in Recruiting Award for your success and dedication to recruiting graduate students.

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Second Annual Graduate Faculty Mentor Award Winner

An outstanding graduate faculty mentor is someone who is devoted and available for their student mentees and assists their mentees in defining and achieving their own pathway to success. These mentors are accessible with their commitment and time and provide valuable knowledge from their own professional experience. They present opportunities to their students for professional growth and offer guidance and support on completing career goals, even beyond degree competition. Graduate student mentors encourage students gain the confidence to pursue their passions.

The Graduate Faculty Mentor finalists included: Dr. Sharon Bowman from the Department of Counseling Psychology, Social Psychology and Counseling, Dr. Mei Zhong from the School of Music, and Dr. YoungAh Lee from the Department of Journalism. Each of these finalists along with every mentor nominated should be recognized for their commitment and devotion to assisting graduate students.

At Ball State University’s annual Graduate School Recognition Ceremony, the Graduate School honored Dr. Sharon Bowman as the winner of the second annual 2018 Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year Winner. Dr. Bowman received an astonishing 15 nominations from current students and Ball State alumni. She is described by her students as the the person who will calm your nerves, build your confidence, and push you to go a little further.

Dr. Bowman is known for unending knowledge and unfailing love for her students. In order to truly understand the lasting impact Dr. Bowman had on her students, here are some thoughts shared from the student nominees:

“Dr. Bowman was there to hear my worries, my concerns, and my struggles while also lovingly pushing me forward to face my fears and to keep working toward my dream of earning my Ph.D., because she believed in me and my abilities. There were countless times over the past 3 years in my doctoral program where I was tired, burnt out, and did not think I would make it. The fact that I have made it this far and that proverbial light at the end of the Ph.D. tunnel is growing brighter is in large part because of her.  I am getting teary-eyed as I write this nomination and realize that I have come to internalize what Dr. Bowman already knew from day one and patiently helped me to see it for myself – my strength and capabilities to achieve my dreams.”

“It is not uncommon for those who have had Dr. Bowman as a clinical supervisor to talk with their friends and say, ‘I had clinical supervision just now and Dr. Bowman looked into my soul.’ No words do it justice. During those times, Dr. Bowman understands what you need as a mentee and she provides it in her compassionate, caring, and yet brutally honest way. I have appreciated Dr. Bowman’s support and guidance during my time at Ball State and I am honored to nominate her for the Graduate Faculty Mentor Award.”

Without any doubts, Dr. Sharon Bowman is incredibly deserving of this award. Dr. Bowman truly goes above and beyond the role of a Department Chair, Dissertation Chair, Mentor and Clinical Supervisor. Congratulations Dr. Bowman on receiving the 2018 Graduate Faculty Mentor Award.

 

 


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Healthcare Executive Amelia Clark to Share How She Created Her Own Opportunities

You’ve heard it before, but Amelia Clark, keynote speaker for this year’s Graduate School Orientation, wants to reiterate, “The sky is the limit!” And the proof is in her personal story, which she will share as the Ball State Graduate School Fall Orientation keynote speaker.

With degrees in anthropology (BA) and philanthropic studies (MA) from Indiana University, Amelia Clark has made a career for herself as an advocate for the underserved in health care. She started her work in school-based clinics, advancing health care access in a variety of types of schools, including the only recovery high school in Indiana, Hope Academy. Eventually, Amelia transitioned into a large hospital system, from which she continued to grow school-based clinics in Central Indiana, focusing on integrated health care. After working in school clinic administration, Amelia became the first Executive Director of the Jane Pauley Community Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) on the east side of Indianapolis.

Currently, Amelia resides with her husband and three children in Muncie, and she has the position of regional vice president for Meridian Health Services. Clearly proud to be a part of the company, Amelia explains, “Meridian Health Services has been a community mental health center for almost 40 years, serving East Central Indiana.” Five years ago, Meridian received a FQHC Look-Alike status for two of its sites, and in 2013 it received a New Access Point grant to fund the FQHC program, which aims to improve the health of vulnerable populations in underserved communities. In her role, Amelia is responsible for overseeing six integrated care sites and the management of $1.9 million in federal grants.

“If you told me when I was an undergrad anthropology student that I would one day be part of leading a large integrated health system, I would not have believed you,” Amelia says. She wants to emphasize to incoming graduate students at Ball State University that now is the time to imagine how you might use the skills you’re developing to create opportunities for yourself and in your community. She cautions, “You get what you give… If you don’t put yourself out there to learn new things and meet new people, you will miss chances to get involved.”

Some of Amelia’s other achievements include being a featured speaker at the National Council for Behavioral Health conference, a published author on social justice pioneers, and an active member of her community. She serves on the boards of several organizations, including the Indiana Primary Health Care Association, the YMCA of Delaware and Blackford Counties, Delaware County Christian Ministries, and Alumni of the Lilly School of Philanthropy and IU.

Amelia’s keynote address is sure to leave you feeling inspired. Register now for the Graduate School Orientation on Thursday, August 17.


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New Award Recognizes Outstanding Graduate Faculty

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Graduate Faculty Mentor Award winner Dr. Kristin Perrone-McGovern (right) was honored with a plaque at The Graduate School’s spring award ceremony.

In the Graduate School, students are at the heart of our mission to provide an atmosphere that fosters scholarship, creativity, intellectual freedom, interdisciplinary study, student-faculty collaboration and integrity within a diverse climate of teachers and learners. The way students learn, grow and experience graduate study is largely influenced by the mentors who walk alongside them during their journey.

With this in mind, two of the Graduate School’s Graduate Recruiting Ambassadors, George Hickman and Robert Young developed the Graduate Faculty Mentor Award.

“I was approached by George first to help him with putting the award together,” Young said. “I thought it was a great idea, recognizing a graduate student mentor. In my own experience, so many professors have reached out to help me, and I know that experience has to be the same for many other departments on campus. We received many nominees for the award—more than I expected for the inaugural year. It really just shows how great Ball State’s teachers are and the important role they play in graduate students’ lives.”

The duo created the Faculty Mentor Award to honor outstanding graduate faculty mentors who are devoted and available for students and who assist their mentees in defining and achieving their own pathways to success. The winner of the award in its first year is Dr. Kristin Perrone-McGovern, a professor in the Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services.

“Dr. McGovern has been essential in helping me to progress in my doctoral studies, encouraging me and supporting me in pursuit of professional activities that will further my career goals,” said Julie Matsen, who nominated McGovern for the award. “I look to her as a model of success in furthering applied neuroscience methodologies in the field of counseling psychology.”

Sharon Bowman, chair of Department of Counseling Psychology said, McGovern is, hands down, the best mentor and “encourager” among her faculty. McGovern’s former students are “shining examples” of her mentorship and instruction—as academics or clinical practitioners, their work with students and clients reflects the mentoring McGovern provided, Bowman said.

This award represents more than recognition of the guidance provided by Ball State faculty; it’s also a tribute to one of the Graduate School’s tenets to take students’ passions seriously. Students who feel supported and encouraged by dedicated faculty gives them the confidence to pursue their passions and grow, both professionally and personally.

Many strong candidates

We received so many strong nominations for the Graduate Faculty Mentor Award in its inaugural year that we’d like to recognize the following finalists:

We appreciate all graduate faculty for continuing to make connections, build relationships and challenge students in their programs.

This post was written by Ciara Johnson, a second-year graduate student at the Center for Emerging Media Design and Development and a former graduate assistant at the Graduate School.


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Student-first strategies earn mathematics advisor recruiting award

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Pictured is Dr. Annette Leitze (right), winner of this year’s GEMMY Award, with Dr. Carolyn Kapinus, Interim Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School.

Each year, graduate program advisors who receive funds to support their recruiting efforts are eligible for the Graduate School’s GEMMY Award, named for the Graduate Enrollment Management (GEM) Program. This year’s winner, like her predecessors, used a student-centered approach and some creativity to increase applications and enrollment in her program.

At Ball State University’s annual Graduate School Recognition Ceremony the Graduate School honored Dr. Annette Leitze for her recruiting efforts in graduate education. As a mathematical science graduate advisor, Leitze has been actively involved in the GEM Program, showing evidence of increased applications and enrollment, and employed innovative recruitment strategies that serve as a case study to be shared with other departments.

“Ann is a tremendous asset to Ball State,” said Online and Distance Education Marketing and Communications Director Nancy Prater. “In all of my interactions with her, it is obvious that she puts students first. Her graduate students are working teachers who are juggling many things in life. She is always thinking about what is best for them.”

Through her participation in the GEM program Leitze has continued to refine her recruiting efforts and using varied strategies to attract students from across the state. With Ball State being a leader in teacher education in the state, Leitze has maintained a strong focus on recruiting Indiana teachers who are aware of Ball State’s reputation.

But one of the most important, and often time consuming, aspects of recruiting is the continued personal contact with prospective students. Leitze said knowing her audience and their needs helps her determine the best type of communication and the kind of information they need and when they need it. Software can assist with sending out emails and managing contacts, but the message is just as critical.

In the fall, Leitze, like past GEMMY winners, will have the opportunity to share in more detail her recruiting efforts during a training session for graduate program directors and advisors.

This post was written by Ciara Johnson, a second-year graduate student at the Center for Emerging Media Design and Development and a former graduate assistant at the Graduate School. 


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Urban Planning staff member earns Graduate School Exemplary Recruiter Award

Christine Rhine, administrative coordinator for Urban Planning, receives her award from Deb Mix, acting associate dean of the Graduate School and professor of English.

Urban Planning Administrative Coordinator Christine Rhine doesn’t just meet the needs of the students she encounters in her position, she works hard to anticipate their needs as well. Her work is instrumental in guiding students to the program, and her work earned her the Ball State University Graduate School’s Exemplary Recruiting Award.

“I was shocked when I realized Dr. [Carolyn] Kapinus was talking about me!” Rhine said, thinking back to the award ceremony when Kapinus, Interim Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School, read aloud the nomination. “I hadn’t suspected a thing when Dr. [Eric] Kelly asked me to accompany him to the presentations.”

To stay a step ahead, Rhine uses her empathy and understanding for students, putting together materials that address potential questions and objections before they become obstacles to a student entering the program.

“I noticed early on that many people don’t know what urban planners do, so I put together a PDF of stories about some of our graduates. This gives incoming students a chance to picture themselves in a variety of planning-related careers and helps them determine if it’s the right degree for them,” Rhine said. “I’ve tried to imagine what it would be like to live on the other side of the world and be applying to attend school here. I have so much respect for students who make such a commitment, so I really try to think ahead to what they need and how I can help.”

Ensuring a knowledge and understanding of what the Urban Planning program has to offer was not the only way Rhine connected with prospective students. Her creativity and willingness to step outside of the box prompted the creation of a new process of writing open letters to newcomers. The letters present a friendly face to newly enrolled students and answer some of their questions from a current student’s point of view.

And others in the program take notice of her Rhine’s efforts. Lohren Ray Deeg, an associate professor of Urban Planning said Rhine prints the word “Welcome” in students’ native languages to hang on the door, visits students who are sick and helps international students feel a sense of community.

“Christine makes every student feel welcome to the department, exhaustively,” said Lohren Ray Deeg, associate professor of Urban Planning. “Christine is the epitomé of hospitality, service and care to our student body, and not only serves the department with distinction, but is a living testament of what service is. Our student and recent alumni agree that Christine’s heart is what makes the Department of Urban Planning a special place in theirs.”

Rhine’s background in news reporting, empathetic nature, and strategic communication techniques create an enjoyable and memorable experience for how prospective students remember and feel about not only the program, but the university culture as well.

“A couple of years ago I met several urban planning students at a Graduate School event who indicated that Christine was instrumental in their decision to attend Ball State University,” Kapinus said. “Christine demonstrates the importance of the work administrative coordinators do in furthering the mission of our university.”

Although Christine admits that “taking care with every email communication to address each person by name is very helpful in setting the tone” when communicating with prospective students, she didn’t realize until the award how much the small things she does in her job everyday impact students.

“Who knew that adding an exclamation point here and a smiley face there could make a notable difference for students looking for support within the university climate?”

This post was written by Ciara Johnson, a second-year graduate student at the Center for Emerging Media Design and Development and a former graduate assistant at the Graduate School. 


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A Day in the Life of Linda White, a master’s student in journalism

Wow, where do I begin. Let me first say I’m not your typical grad student. I spent 25+ years as an anchor reporter in four different states, raised a daughter, taught Sunday School and served on various community boards before chucking it all to return to graduate school. It was exciting and scary all at the same time.

In a matter of two weeks in late April/early May 2016, I sent inquiry emails about grad schools, exchanged emails with my future grad advisor here at Ball State, wrote a 1000-word purpose statement, received acceptance into the program, interviewed and was offered a grad assistantship. I’m a woman of faith, and I believe it was truly God’s plan! Unlike my undergrad years of procrastination, attending campus organization meetings and well, doing the bar crawl (did I say that aloud?), I keep a pretty mundane and structured graduate schedule. Here it is!

Grad Assistantship days – Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays

My day starts around 6:30 a.m. as I sleepily listen/watch local news and play Candy Crush. (don’t hate—lol) Shortly thereafter, I’m getting out of bed to make my breakfast and lunch to take to work. Yes, eating out is expensive on a grad school budget. Making and cooking your own meals is THE best way to save money! I have two chihuahuas. So once the meals are prepared, backpack packed and I’m dressed, I take them for a walk before getting on the Muncie city bus to campus. It’s free, sort of—we pay for it in our semester fee.

I have to be at work at 9 a.m. I work at Sponsored Projects Administration (SPA). This office helps Ball State researchers and students find and apply for grant money. In my assistantship, I’m the editor of Research magazine. I write about how researchers use grant dollars. I’ve learned there are a lot of amazing people who do extraordinary research here on campus. Fortunately, since we have about a half dozen grad students in the office, I’m able to set my own hours. I work, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, two seven-hour days and one six-hour day. If I’m not working on the magazine, I’m working on course assignments: watching lecture videos, reading chapters, doing homework.

Classroom days – Tuesday, Thursday

Pictured are Linda White’s chihuahuas asleep next to her while she tries to study.

I have a Methods class that meets on campus Tuesday and Thursday this semester from 5-6:15 p.m. Tuesday is one of my days to sleep in, but typically after walking the girls, (Gabby and Giovanna) I come to campus to work in the library to do more course work/reading and preparing for Tuesday night’s class. I have a study carrel in the library. It’s like your own private office, with a coat rack, desk, chair and computers. Why don’t I just stay at home until class begins? Well, my four-legged daughters are spoiled and like to cuddle and be held or lavished with attention. If you have a pet, you know exactly what I’m talking about and it’s hard to read that 30-50 page chapter/journal article when you’re constantly being interrupted. So, I come to campus, again packing breakfast and/or lunch.

That brings me to the rest of the week – Friday, Saturday and Sunday

So Friday, I typically take off, go to the grocery store, clean the apartment and of course walk the girls. There are weeks I have an abundance of work and schedule Friday, on my calendar, that this day, 10-4, at the library, is dedicated to such-and-such class. Saturday, I try to get to the library by 9 and repeat the process. Sunday, the library doesn’t open until 10, so this is another day I get to sleep in before… you guessed it… heading to the library. I find I do my best class work, during the day and try to get seven to eight hours of sleep a night.

Pictured is Linda with Raisuddin Bhuiyan, the subject of this year’s Freshmen Common Reader book.

Saturday night I typically make a dinner that can be repeated during the work week. Sunday night I make a different dinner that can be swapped out for the other.

Other notes

At the beginning of each semester I put due dates in my Google calendar with alarms that give me heads up, one day, three days, one week and if it’s a paper, two weeks notice.

Pictured is Linda with author Anand Giridharadas during a campus event.

I’ve subscribed to every campus email (Yes, I actually erase after I read). That’s how I knew as a student I could attend the symphony for free. I also met the author/journalist and the subject of “The True American, Murder and Mercy in Texas.” And there are some awesome free Friday movie nights at Prius Hall (although I’m usually too tired to attend-lol.)

When I’m not worried about the next paper or assignment, I’m worried about paying for grad school and missing my 24-year-old married daughter who lives in Alabama. On some nights, that’s what keeps me up, but I’m usually too tired to do too much worrying due to all of the intellectual stimulation. 😀

I have no regrets about this decision. It can be mind-numbing and overwhelming at times, but I know it’s totally worth it! If I can do it at my age, anyone can!